Technology Transcending the Classroom

By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

@its_riDICKulous

The Patricia R. Guerreri Academic Commons, or GAC, is housing an interactive exhibit called “Our Transdisciplinary World: Technology, Science and the Humanities” from now until Dec. 22.

The exhibit was created to demonstrate how SU creatively utilizes technology and features multiple devices, including the 3-D printer MakerLab located in GAC, software that analyzes the messages in Shakespearian plays, and geographic information systems, or GIS, all of which allow students and faculty to expand upon ideas presented in the classroom. The primary idea was crafted by Janie Kreines, the Exhibits & Artifacts Curator at the Nabb Center, according to Dr. Michael Scott, interim dean of the Henson School.

Posters are displayed around the exhibit to explain the purpose of the featured equipment, coupled with multiple computer stations that visitors are encouraged to click through and watch, to help paint a better picture of how the technology works.

The exhibition was a collaboration from professors across the disciplines, including Dr. Michael Scott, interim dean of the Henson School, Chris Woodall of SU Libraries, and Dr. Randy Cone of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department.

The technology is not limited to the confines of the classroom.

“We’ve got folks in most of our academic departments using the power of GIS,” Dr. Scott said. “I just created a map for the Nursing/Health Sciences folks that display all of the locations across the United States where SU has placed clinical students.”

Students can utilize the equipment for personal purposes as well.

“Besides their work in classes, students often make personal maps of their favorite bike rides, their planned trip across the country—all sorts of possibilities,” Dr. Scott said.

In terms of the MakerLab, which houses the 3D printer, the creative possibilities are endless.

“You don’t even have to be affiliated with SU at all,” Chris Woodall said. “We do charge a small fee, which is the same for everyone and varies by the size of the object.”

There are minimal restrictions on what can be printed, including categories like guns.

Like many other colleges across the nation, Salisbury University has made it a priority to incorporate technology into the classroom. Whether it be using slideshows, orchestrating clicker quizzes or facilitating online discussion boards, technology has become a crucial part of the college learning experience.

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Gullfest 2017 Recap

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By HALEY DICK & DREW LACOUTURE

Gull Life Editor/Editorial Editor

For this year’s annual Gullfest event, SU’s Student Organization for Activity Planning (SOAP) aimed more for a festival style show and, based on student reactions, it was a success. The show was hosted by the lively crew from MTV’s Wild N’ Out and kicked off by funk-pop group Ripe, followed by pop singer Niykee Heaton, with Hip-Hop artist and headliner D.R.A.M. to close.

Admission encompassed a t-shirt as well as access to outside games like cornhole and ladderball with a creative addition—free body painting. Food and clothing vendors were also set up at the festival and available to students for purchasing.

Students gradually trickled in after the doors opened, and Wild N’ Out got the crowd hyped up before the performances, as well in between the first and second acts, with crowd participation and friendly competition. Similar to their show, there was a lot of roasting to be had.

Despite technical difficulties regarding the microphone and the amplifiers, as well as three power outages, Ripe used their stage presence and creative improvisation to keep the show alive. The band acknowledged their power problems, and thanked the audience for being awesome and bearing with them.

After the first performance, freshman computer science and business double major Ralph Mehitang shared his thoughts on what he saw; he thought Ripe was really good, and Wild N’ Out were hilarious.

“So far, I’m really enjoying [Gullfest.] Of course, more students should make the decision to come, but from what I’m seeing, I am really enjoying it.”

Niykee Heaton, more commonly known for her modeling, played a few new tracks not yet released, and the crowd garnered a positive reaction. Her biggest verbal message for the audience was, “If you have a team, you have everything,” after sharing her story of how her best friend helped her achieve her dreams of becoming an artist.

D.R.A.M. took the stage as the closing act of the event, with Salisbury marking the conclusion of his college campus tour, as well as his stay on the East Coast. The majority of the crowd kept a continual high level of energy throughout the entire lineup, but D.R.A.M.’s performance and motto to “spread love” gained the most reaction.

“D.R.A.M. was great,” freshman physics major Elliot Hirtle said. “He really knew how to hype up the crowd, and he is a great performer.”

Madison Baber, sophomore elementary education major, thought last year’s artists were better, but this year’s event definitely ran smoother and was more enjoyable.

“The artists [last year,] Breakfast and Jason Derulo, were better to me just because they were people that I knew and actually listened to their music,” Baber said. “That being said, I really enjoyed the atmosphere of Gullfest this year, with it being outside and the fun new experience of body art. This year was also better because the artists were there on time, and did not show up hours late.”

SOAP had a set limit of 3,000 tickets, yet only around 550 were sold. The cause of this is undetermined, though last year’s complications may have played a factor.

Despite the lesser turnout, the students who attended seemed to have a genuinely good time with constant high energy and art-covered bodies, and remain optimistic for what SOAP will provide in Gullfests to come.

“Everything We Keep” is everything a reader wants

By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

In “Everything We Keep,” author Kerry Lonsdale keeps the reader captivated page after page through a dense plot filled with unexpected events, romance and strong character development.

It is an adult fiction novel listed as a top Amazon bestseller of 2016 and a Wall Street Journal bestseller that breaks the reader’s heart just to build it back together again, only to tear it right back out by the next chapter.

Lonsdale sets the stage in the first chapter with heavy heartbreak, in which the protagonist, Aimee Tierney, is attending the funeral of her fiancé, James Donato, whom she had been dating since she was eight years old. Talk about a tear-jerker.

Later in time, Aimee discovers that James is indeed still alive and the reader follows her in uncovering the mystery of what happened to James at the hands of his dysfunctional family, as well as the journey Aimee takes through her loss and recovery from love.

The novel’s strengths lie in its unique plot twists that leave the reader both relieved and irritated as the story comes to a close. The journey to the end of the book pieces the characters together in an invisible web that makes sense once the conflicts are resolved, though some may argue that the ending is too much of a cliffhanger.

While the novel is impressive, it does have setbacks. The author provides too many obvious clues that can leave the reader guessing what is going to come next, but she does still leave the element of surprise in some instances.

The title itself, “Everything We Keep,” reflects the major theme of secrets that is present throughout the storyline, for most of the characters in the novel grapple with something or someone they have lost in the past.

The sequel, “Everything We Left Behind,” will be released in July 2017, and will continue the tale of what happens after the epilogue of “Everything We Keep.” The question readers are asking will hopefully be answered: will Aimee be tempted to fall back into the arms of James?

This book is ideal for mature readers, as some of the conflicts pertain to situations college-aged readers can grasp. Some of these concepts include career obstacles and medical diagnoses. The characters in the novel, especially Aimee, teach the reader lessons on how to overcome uncertainty, set and accomplish goals and continue forward after losing someone foundational.

The Flyer gives “Everything We Keep” a 9/10.

Nieves, Falcone continue WLAX season across the pond this summer

By HALEY DICK & CHRIS MACKOWIAK

Gull Life Editor/Sports Editor

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The Sea Gulls have their eyes set on the NCAA Tournament after receiving an automatic bid with their CAC Championship win. Hannah Wichrowski photo

While her Sea Gull career may end on the final whistle of a game soon, Salisbury women’s lacrosse senior middie Gabbi Nieves will continue her collegiate career across the pond this summer alongside her teammate, junior goalkeeper Gianna Falcone.

After sifting through 7,600 candidates, the U.S. National Team selected the two Sea Gulls as part of their Division III team. They will trek across the Atlantic Ocean to play in Guildford, England as part of the ten-day 2017 Women’s Lacrosse World Cup Festival this summer.

The Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) welcomes in teams from 25 nations across the world to play in their tournament to be held at Surrey Sports Park. The Salisbury students are just two of 30 DIII athletes selected for the team.

“The feeling of being selected is indescribable. It will be about learning to play with different people and adjusting to different situations,” Falcone said, “and that’s kind of how it is here when we get new players coming in each season. You have to learn to mesh and work with people and cope with your environment.”

In contrast to Nieves, for Falcone, the opportunity is a pit stop this summer as she continues her solid Salisbury University career. The trusted hand inside the cage has received many honors over her time as a Sea Gull, rising from Capital Athletic Conference (CAC) Rookie of the Year in 2015 and building up to an Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches’ Association (IWLCA) Third Team All-American nomination a season ago.

The Florham Park, N.J. native has not let up a beat in the 2017 season, rallying for a 7.25 goals-against average and a 46.8 save percentage over her 15 starts. For Falcone, the experience garners a perfect chance to work on her craft and enjoy the moment.

“I am looking forward to travelling and experiencing this with one of my best friends, and just working and focusing on me and playing against other countries and teams and seeing a lot of different types of shots,” Falcone said.

Instead of a stop along the way, the selection is a capstone to a strong Sea Gull career for Nieves. The Centreville, Va. native has accumulated 90 goals and 21 assists to total 111 points over her career. As a complete player and middie, Nieves also has recorded 80 ground balls, 71 draw controls and 56 caused turnovers across her four years.

SU head coach Jim Nestor looks back fondly on Nieves’ career at Salisbury and her growth over four years.

“I love just seeing her grow from self-protocol to now helping lead the team to, hopefully, another CAC Championship, and just watching her mature over time,” coach Nestor said.

Over her four-year career, the Salisbury middie sees fond memories both at the very start and towards the end of her career

“My first year and our team winning a national championship and last year being named [IWLCA] First-Team All-American was something I didn’t see coming, and felt really great,” Nieves said.

Despite all the accolades and success on the field at Salisbury, the selection is a reminder of what athletics and sports are all about at their core for both players and their head coach. Nieves and Falcone spent three years together on the team as key players to the squad.

“I am just looking forward to being able to go and have fun playing lacrosse because that’s all we want to do,” Falcone said. “Sometimes you forget about that and you have to bring that back and I think it will be a really great opportunity to get to do that.”

The friendships cultivated from coming from a close-knit group is also what Nieves will miss most after she graduates.

“The friendships that I’ve made on and off the field…I feel like our team is especially close, so I will definitely take that with me when I leave SU,” Nieves said.

Hidden beneath this high accolade is the mission to spread the sport of lacrosse across seas to other nations. One hot-bed is Europe, specifically the United Kingdom, where the festival is set to take place.

Coach Nestor sets his players on their way, reminding them of the deeper importance and meaning behind their trip.

“[I hope they enjoy] being overseas and representing our university and the U.S. in that positive lacrosse way and just gaining the experience of how other cultures view lacrosse, especially women’s,” coach Nestor said.

As members of the national team, the two women’s lacrosse stars become ambassadors for the greater nation, but they have surely also become proud ambassadors of the Sea Gulls that fly through Sea Gull Stadium each spring.

“Everything We Keep” is everything a reader wants

By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

In “Everything We Keep,” author Kerry Lonsdale keeps the reader captivated page after page through a dense plot filled with unexpected events, romance and strong character development.

It is an adult fiction novel listed as a top Amazon bestseller of 2016 and a Wall Street Journal bestseller that breaks the reader’s heart just to build it back together again, only to tear it right back out by the next chapter.

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Cover for Everything We Keep. Image from kerrylonsdale.com

Lonsdale sets the stage in the first chapter with heavy heartbreak, in which the protagonist, Aimee Tierney, is attending the funeral of her fiancé, James Donato, whom she had been dating since she was eight years old. Talk about a tear-jerker.

Later in time, Aimee discovers that James is indeed still alive and the reader follows her in uncovering the mystery of what happened to James at the hands of his dysfunctional family, as well as the journey Aimee takes through her loss and recovery from love.

The novel’s strengths lie in its unique plot twists that leave the reader both relieved and irritated as the story comes to a close. The journey to the end of the book pieces the characters together in an invisible web that makes sense once the conflicts are resolved, though some may argue that the ending is too much of a cliffhanger.

While the novel is impressive, it does have setbacks. The author provides too many obvious clues that can leave the reader guessing what is going to come next, but she does still leave the element of surprise in some instances.

The title itself, “Everything We Keep,” reflects the major theme of secrets that is present throughout the storyline, for most of the characters in the novel grapple with something or someone they have lost in the past.

The sequel, “Everything We Left Behind,” will be released in July 2017, and will continue the tale of what happens after the epilogue of “Everything We Keep.” The question readers are asking will hopefully be answered: will Aimee be tempted to fall back into the arms of James?

This book is ideal for mature readers, as some of the conflicts pertain to situations college-aged readers can grasp. Some of these concepts include career obstacles and medical diagnoses. The characters in the novel, especially Aimee, teach the reader lessons on how to overcome uncertainty, set and accomplish goals and continue forward after losing someone foundational.

The Flyer gives “Everything We Keep” a 9/10.

Doing big things at Big Event

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By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

The Salisbury Student Government Association (SGA) hosted their 13th annual Big Event on April 8, in which several recognized student clubs and organizations volunteered to go out into the Salisbury community and make a difference one house at a time.

Volunteers were assigned cleanup locations throughout the neighborhoods in which they helped residents with tasks such as raking leaves and weeding, though activities ranged based on the needs of the individuals.

Salisbury city administrator and SU alumna Julia Glanz spoke on behalf of the gratitude of Mayor Jake Day and the city of Salisbury.

“The city of Salisbury truly appreciates you,” Glanz said. “This really does make an impact in the community. So please, when you’re out there, get to know the folks you’re working with and get to talk to the neighbors. Hear their stories because they’ve got a lot to share.”

One group of volunteers spent the morning raking and bagging pine needles that covered the entire area of the back yard. However, they were not sent to the task alone.

Kenny Jones, Salisbury resident and photography teacher at Parkside, worked alongside the group to help get the job done in one session.

“There are a lot of reasons for yard conditions to be the way they are, and for the university to send out volunteers, for me, it was an act of love back to the community,” Jones shared.

The students enjoyed putting in the work just as much as the recipients loved the outcome.

Sophomore Jenna Rusk shared that her biggest takeaway was how happy all the people were when the job was done, and how kind and appreciative they acted towards the volunteers.

Around 550 students sacrificed their Saturday morning to participate in Big Event, some for a few years in a row.

“I like how everyone wakes up early on a Saturday to come together and help the community as a whole,” sophomore Jessica Wooster said. “This is my second year doing Big Event, and I always have a blast.”

SGA worked tirelessly to empty the seemingly endless reusable bags of leaves and sticks to return them quickly to the volunteers to reuse. The cycle did not end until every job site was complete.

Leroy Satchell, former administrative representative and alumnus of Salisbury University class of 2006, expressed tremendous gratitude for the service the volunteers provided him.

“What would I do without Big Event? The ladies were amazing and worked diligently,” Satchell said. “I wouldn’t have been able to accomplish the task without Big Event.”

Saferide shuts down upcoming weekend operations

By HALEY DICK

Screen Shot 2017-04-06 at 3.56.29 PM

Photo by Jessica Schmitz.

Gull Life Editor

Saferide, SU’s student-run transportation service, has announced that this weekend, Apr. 6—Apr. 8, they will not be operating following multiple accounts of unlawful and disrespectful behavior from their passengers.

The organization has six vans and numerous student employees that provide rides back to campus for students at off-campus locations within a three-mile radius. Their goal is to offer students free, anonymous and secure rides back to campus in hopes of promoting good decision-making.

Throughout the spring semester, violations of Saferide and state law policies have occurred on a progressively regular basis, and a line had to be drawn.

Allen Reynolds, Saferide driver and vice President of personnel, described the reoccurring incidents as a graph of exponential growth. The instances kept accumulating, and there was no other way around the situation than to temporarily shut down the operation.

“I cannot put my staff in a position of being harassed and having to deal with all these issues,” Saferide President Chris Whalen said. “It’s not fair to them.”

The drivers work to provide fast transportation for their classmates in order to insure that they get home safely. Whalen shared that some of the drivers work at Saferide because drunk driving has personally affected them and they want to make a difference for their fellow students.

If the temporary shutdown is not enough to show students the effects of their actions, the executive board will continue to brainstorm different ways on how to end the constant battle between the drivers and the students to ensure a better relationship between the two.

“This is step one in the process, and if we need to take things further, we will,” Whalen said. “If our message does not get across, we will take further action.”

The organization does not solely operate as a sober driving system, and not all the passengers are to blame. As Reynolds said, “Saferide is not a drunk bus. We are so much more than that.”

There is a range between those who use the service out of need, and those who take advantage of it. Saferide gets plenty of service from students who are out late studying and are simply looking for a safer way to get back to their homes other than walking in the dark.

The organization is here for the benefit of the student body, which is why the board expressed so much disappointment and concern, resulting in the halt of the organization’s services.

“It is not just about having thick skin,” Tricia Garvey Smith, director of the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership, said. “It is about breaking the law.”

In an email sent out to Salisbury University students by Smith on behalf of Saferide, it clearly stated: “this is in no way an invitation to engage in irresponsible or illegal activities, including but not limited to driving under any influences.” Students are expected to find other safe modes of transportation in the absence of Saferide.

The organization has not indicated when they will be up and operating again for student service.

Update: On Apr. 13, Saferide announced that operations would resume for the weekend of Apr. 13 through 15. The email from the Saferide Executive Board to the Salisbury University student population read as:

“Thank you for you cooperation through last weekend’s  suspension of our service. We must work together as a student body to treat Saferide employees as well as fellow passengers with the utmost respect at all times.”

“As a reminder, any alcohol, tobacco, or electronic cigarettes are not tolerated in our vans under any circumstances. Additionally, we do not drop off at any restaurants, bars, or any other commercial locations or pick up from campus.”

C.O.A.T helps Salisbury community battle addiction

coat

Photo By: Haley Dick

By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

@its_riDICKulous

The Wicomico County Health Department, with funding from the county and the city, has collaboratively worked to create a program to help residents of Wicomico County combat addiction.

 The Community Outreach Addictions Team, otherwise known as C.O.A.T, established itself in June 2016 with the intention to work towards combating the heroin epidemic throughout the county, but provides guidance for all opioid addictions. According to their informational pamphlet, C.O.A.T’s goal is “to stop overdoses and provide a smooth transition to treatment services.”

 The team of peer support specialists act as an available resource to struggling addicts by sharing their personal knowledge and experiences of addiction and recovery to help them find the hope and purpose they are looking for during the initial steps to recovery.

 Tasha Jamison, registered peer supervisor of the C.O.A.T team, speaks about how the program has been effective and successful over the time it has been in action.

 “It has been very beneficial to the hospital, and law enforcement has been utilizing it on a regular basis as well. It has been an amazing community effort. The collaboration between agencies is something other counties will say, ‘how did you do that? Hospitals don’t talk to people outside of the hospital? Law enforcement doesn’t talk to people outside of law enforcement.’ But, all of our local agencies realized that nobody could fix this if they were keeping everything secret.”

 While the direct assistance of the program comes from the peer specialists, Jamison shares that college students and community members can help the efforts of C.O.A.T in additional ways.

 “The most important things are education, identifying individuals and taking away the stigma. I encourage anyone in the community to go to the free [Narcan] training offered every month in the library, and with that free training you get a prescription or the kit when you are there, because you just never know when you are going to walk into a bathroom in your home and find somebody passed out. If you have that in your pocket, you can save a life.”

 The Salisbury University Counseling Center helps SU students cope with addiction as well by providing intake assessment, individual or group therapy, referral to more intensive treatment programs as well as consultations with those hoping to encourage a loved one to fight back against their addiction.

 Dr. Kathleen Scott, director of the counseling center, provides advice for students suffering from addiction.

 “Many aspects of alcohol abuse, mixing alcohol and other drugs, and use of heroin, opioids and other prescription drugs can be lethal, in addition to damaging various aspects of a person’s life,” Scott said. “Express your concern and get help for your friends who are abusing alcohol and using other drugs. Don’t be afraid to talk about it.”

 Those in the professional field are not the only people to acknowledge the critical issue of substance abuse. Senior community health major and psychology minor and Counseling Center intern Devynn Detzer is working to create a health promotion program in collaboration with three other community health interns working through the Wellness Program and Student Health Services.

 “Together, we hope to eventually create a collaborative video addressing the issue with an overlying goal of creating awareness and erasing the stigma that goes along with substance abuse,” Detzer said. “Ultimately, we would like to educate the campus community on opioid and heroin abuse by creating and promoting awareness of facts and data available, and approach the topic of stigma in relation to these types of addictions, hopefully diminishing the negativity that coincides with the topic as well as spreading awareness that getting addicted to these drugs could happen to anyone and it is okay to seek help.”

 Students should be on the lookout for flyers promoting the student-constructed video and utilize the Counseling Center for any additional related questions.

 Those residing in the surrounding area and personally battling addiction who need an understanding ear of guidance are encouraged to call the C.O.A.T team at (443) 783-6875. As for friends and family struggling to watch their loved ones combat addiction and get clean, call (410) 742- 3784 to reach the Addictions Support Network where a peer recovery specialist will happily set a meeting to answer any circulating questions, broad or specific.

SU students give real definition to the name “New Zoo”

By HALEY DICK

Gull Life Editor

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A depiction of the aftermath of a party in “New Zoo,” courtesy of local resident John D. Robinson Sr. on his Facebook post.

The residents of the local Salisbury community were agitated by the trash that flooded the ground in what is known to SU students as “New Zoo,” consisting of Cedar Crossing and Varsity Lane.

Partying is a well-known staple in the college experience. Movies such as “Blue Mountain State,” “Neighbors” and many others promote the excess participation in drugs and alcohol.

According to Christopher Ingraham with The Washington Post, a “survey found that roughly 59.8 percent of full-time college students ages 18 to 22 drank at least monthly.”

College and partying almost seem to be synonymous in our society today, though it is agreed that not all college students are lumped into this category, as depicted in the survey results above.  However, at SU, the partying and noise complaints of one incident have stemmed to pollution.

It has been brought to the attention of social media that several party-goers, typically college students flocking from SU, have been leaving their empty beer cans and red solo cups along the road in the streets of New Zoo, particularly on Cedar Crossing, including the parking lots of the developments and the sidewalks.

John D. Robinson Sr., a resident of the town of Salisbury, has gotten 138 likes and 421 shares on Facebook regarding his disgust with the litter.

“SU students. This is beyond ridiculous!! Clean up your mess and whoever owns these properties should be ashamed.”

Robinson’s post sparked a conversation within the comments that was mostly in agreement with his point of view. Commenters were describing the students who consciously left the trash on the ground as spoiled, disrespectful and unacceptable.

Throughout the commenters were also individuals defending the student population who did not participate in the pollution.

Melissa Cullen, a resident of Salisbury, commented, “I must say that this year, the students that live near the college in my neighborhood have been awesome! No trash issue what so ever and they are great young adults! Friendly additions to our community!”

Jacob Day, mayor of Salisbury, has heard the voices of the community and addressed the issue of concern.

“This is the first major gathering that we have had at that location in some time. It was something that needed a quick response and received it, but, of course, we prefer to not have this sort of situation.”

Day indicated that the Housing and Community Development Department (HCDD) issued 25 citations to the landlord, one to each of the 25 units where there was litter on the ground. Each citation had the potential of being fined $1,000 a day after 24 hours of no clean-up action being taken, but there was a quick, cooperative turnaround from the management company resulting in a full-scale clean up and all fines being dissolved.

For decades, there has been major conflict between Salisbury University students and the neighborhoods in which they live. Mayor Day commented on how the situation has changed.

“In the last two years, we have not seen any of those concerns from the neighbors. It has dramatically turned around; things are different and so much better. There is a fantastic relationship between students and the Camden and university neighborhoods, and the major difference was that the university changed its punishments for off-campus parties, with the consequences becoming more severe. It has been effective.”

Day’s final remarks touched upon the importance of the University and its students to the city of Salisbury as a whole.

“My aspirations for our community are really dependent upon us being a place where students not only want to come to school, but where young educated entrepreneurs want to stay after college. This place can be that, and we are already on our way.”

Mayor Day also emphasized the golden rule, which is how important it is for us to remember to treat everyone with respect, no matter our age.

“I think we have seen a lot of that, and this is just one incident that is not unusual in a college town, but something that we can all learn from to do better.”

French cinema rekindles at SU

By Haley Dick

Gull Life Editor

The French American Cultural Exchange Tournées Festival is bringing contemporary French cinema to Salisbury University through the Fulton School of Liberal Arts.

French cinema serves as a guiding force for directors and producers across the globe, and it is an inspiration to artists of many variations.

The website www.filmsdefrance.com states, “For more than a century, France has been a major influence on cinema and continues to be one of the most important producers of film. The industry is heavily subsidized by the state and is supported by various initiatives that have been introduced by a succession of governments since the Second World War to promote diversity and counter the threats posed by television and Hollywood.”

While most Americans tend to stick to films produced through directors of the United States, there are organizations and venues across the country that host showings of French cinema, including the San Francisco Film Society, which had a listing of nine French films showing this past spring of 2016 at the 59th San Francisco International Film Festival. SU is among these venues this spring semester of 2017.

In total, six French films will be shown in Fulton room 111 at 7 pm, all of which are open to the public and free of admission.

The festival is sponsored by the Fulton School and Marteen Pereboom, dean of Fulton, as well as by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy of the U.S., the French Cultural Fund, the Florence Gould Foundation, and many others.

Claire Kew with the Department of Modern Language and Intercultural Studies played an intricate role in facilitating the festival itself.

“Dr. Aurélie Van de Wiele and I were awarded the Tournées grant from the French Cultural Embassy. This grant allows us to obtain the rights to screen six French films on campus over the course of the semester. Dr. Van de Wiele and I knew from the start that we would each want to present a film during the film festival, and we sought other professors from various disciplines to present films related to their area of expertise,” Kew states.

Kulavuz-Onal shared her hope of what students will take away from the screenings. She was selected to introduce a film on behalf of the English department.

“I think this is not only about France or French cinema. I think that students should be exposed to foreign films all the time. I think from these screenings, students will especially take away new understandings on the relationships between language, culture, identity and belonging from immigrant experiences,” Dr. Kulavuz-Onal shares. “I hope that the screening will contribute to increased appreciation for cultural and linguistic diversity in the world, in the United States, and in our immediate communities such as the SU campus.”

For the full schedule and more information on who will be announcing each film, visit SU’s News site or http://www.salisbury.edu/news/article.html?id=7133