An inconvenient critique: Analyzing the trailer for Al Gore’s new film

By LUKE WATHEN

Staff Writer

This summer, politician and environmentalist Al Gore is planning to release “An Inconvenient Sequel,” a sequel to his hit documentary “An Inconvenient Truth.” The film is meant to discuss the continued issue of climate change where the first film left off, yet its trailer seems to be giving mixed signals of its true intent.

Al Gore has been a household name since the early 1990s.  He previously served as vice president under the Clinton administration from 1993 to 2001 and also became known for his bid for president in 2000, a bid which he narrowly lost to George W. Bush in what became the closest presidential election in American history.

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Movie poster from Tribute.ca

 

In 2006, Gore became the face of the climate change community with “An Inconvenient Truth.” The documentary brought the idea of climate change and global warming into the forefront of discussion among American citizens and policymakers. Gore received equal praise and criticism for the film.

While many lauded Gore’s ability to use his political presence as a platform for a righteous cause, others felt that he was simply trying to boost his own prestige after his controversial election loss six years prior. Others also rebutted many of his arguments, arguing that the data he presented was, in some cases, inaccurate.

Despite the criticisms, the film was a major financial and cultural success and netted Gore a Nobel Peace Prize the following year. To this day, the film is used in many schools and universities to educate students on the presence and dangers of climate change and ways to fight it.

A trailer was recently released for Gore’s sequel, “An Inconvenient Sequel,” which continues to fuel the mystery of his true intentions and credibility. Based on the trailer alone, the complaints of Gore naysayers seem to have a degree of legitimacy.

While the topics of the film are meant to give an update on the ongoing issue of global climate change, the trailer itself feels more like an attack advertisement on incumbent President Donald Trump. In fact, much of the trailer consists of clips from Trump’s speeches intercut with footage and images from areas with ecological damage.

After watching this trailer, one must wonder if Gore is truly acting out of altruism rather than political gain. The 2016 election is still fresh in the minds of Americans, including Gore, who openly endorsed and campaigned on behalf of Democratic-nominee Hillary Clinton.

With that said, the fact that the trailer is so fixated on Trump makes its message a bit skewed. It is unclear whether this film is more concerned with saving the environment rather than electing a Democrat in 2020.

As a former senator, vice president and presidential nominee, Gore is no stranger to politics. Even his first film spent some time addressing his past in the public sector but the message of environmentalism still took center stage.

With this new film, it does not seem clear what Gore’s intentions are. It is impossible to tell since the film has yet to be released, but one cannot help but contemplate that this may be nothing more than a bit of petty vengeance from a man who feels that he and his colleague were cheated out of the presidency.

Hopefully Gore will set his own gripes and biases aside in this film to reach across partisan lines and unite people in an issue that affects everyone. In an era where truth and opinion are often blurred, partisanship is just as inconvenient as climate change.

“An Inconvenient Sequel” is set for release on July 28 of this year.

 

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Comments

  1. Doug stickels says:

    Trump is trying to expedite destruction of efforts to deal with climate change. That is the reason for focus on trump by gore. As a side, it makes sense as well to point to elections of people who are sane people…you know…people who respect science.

    Like

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