Bingewatchers: The Seasoning House

By Lilly Metcalfe

Most scary movies consist of non-existent horrors, while “The Seasoning House” depicts something that is terrifyingly real, something that is happening all around the planet. It is something evasive, evil and immoral.

It is rape.

“The Seasoning House” is a brilliantly crafted thriller that explores the controversial world of prostitution. It depicts the grim world of rape and abuse beautifully, providing viewers with fear, anger and suspense. It is a movie you would want to watch if you can handle watching some gore, drug abuse and sexual exploitation.

The main character is deaf, so most of the film consists of little dialogue and small noises. My recommendation is to watch the film so late night that no one is texting, no one is posting anything, so you will not be distracted while the movie is playing. It will make the thriller drastically less horrific if you are not watching the whole time. This movie demands the viewer’s utmost attention.

On Netflix it received three and a half stars, which is pretty good for Netflix thriller movie standards. It is relatively short, about an hour and thirty minutes long, which makes it a convenient choice especially for time restricted students.

The story is about a young German girl kidnapped during war and put in a prostitution house. Viewers gradually learn pieces of information about the main character through series of flashbacks. She watched her mother and sister die, her father abandoned her, she is deaf, she is sexually abused and she is forced to tend to the other girls in the house. Her true name is never revealed, but the manager of the prostitution house, Viktor, calls her “his little angel” or just Angel.

Everyday life for Angel is a continuous and tormenting routine; she is forced to prep the other stolen girls by doping them in order to prepare them to be used by men and then has to clean them up after they are raped, so the next set of men can have their turn. She witnesses the violence the girls undergo as well as learns the unsettling fact that they will never get out of the house alive.

The viewers of the movie experience what a prostitution house really is: a place where young girls are victimized and ultimately killed in a slow and painful process.

The scenery is perfect in conveying such a dark theme. The house is dirty, unkempt, bloodstained, moldy, dim-lighted. The filth of the house makes the horrors of the forced abuse realistic. It depicts that the girls are in unsanitary conditions and that they are vulnerable.

The scenery only enhances the sympathy one feels for each of the unfortunate girls. The woods are foggy and full of corpses of the girls that never made it out of the house alive. The fog is a common metaphor keeping things hidden. It helps create the suspense for viewers, as they do not know who will be safe.

The acting is relatively good, but Angel makes weird (and annoying) moaning noises when she falls down or gets hit. The secondary characters, unlike most actors of thriller movies, are decent actors with conveying emotion and delivering lines with ease. The dialogue that was said could have been better, but it wasn’t the most important thing in helping create the suspense and tension.

The storyline over all is satisfactory and is different, as it does not follow the usual horror movie storyline template. The central character becomes a heroic figure instead of staying a victimized young girl. The plot twist at the end wasn’t the best, but does leave viewers thirsty for more.

The Flyer gives “The Seasoning House” a 6/10.

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